The Student Connection

...a student-run newsletter

Mentor Dee Britton, CDL Academic Area Coordinator, Publishes Book Chapter Exploring "Dark Elegy"

By Dee Britton, academic area coordinator, social theory, social structure and change, Center for Distance Learning

March 5, 2012

Dee BrittonDee Britton, at left, assistant professor and academic area coordinator at the Center for Distance Learning, published a chapter, “Dark Elegy: The Embodiment of Terrorism in the American Memorial Landscape,” in the newly released book, "Rhetoric, Remembrance, and Visual Form: Sighting Memory," published by Routledge Studies in Rheotric and Communication, Anne Teresa Demo and Bradford Vivian, editors (October 24, 2011).

This case study explores the challenges and issues associated with the placement of a memorial dedicated to victims of terrorism in the American national public commemorative landscape. "Dark Elegy," at right, a work comprised of 76 sculptures, was initially created as a memorial to those killed in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am 103 and was later designated as a memorial to all victims of terrorism in a House of Representatives' bill. This chapter discusses the origin and exhibition of "Dark Elegy" and then explores the contestation that occurs between instrumental and cultural representations of collective memory.Dark Elegy memorial

Britton's primary teaching areas are in the social sciences and social-science research methods. She has taught courses and independent studies in disaster, collective memory, perspectives of terrorism, place/space and visual studies. Her research interests include how groups usecollective memory to create and reinforce identities, particularly the use of collective memory in the construction of nationalism.