Not-For-Profit Management

A Guide to Credit for Prior Learning

Typical Learning Experiences of Students Earning Lower-Level Credit:

  • Work in a non-profit environment, often in a supervisory role.
  • Attend training courses in areas such as supervision for not-for-profits, fundraising, supervising volunteers, and various topics relating specifically to the not-for-profit sector.

Typical Learning Experiences of Students Earning Upper-Level Credit:

  • Work for at least a few years in a non-profit environment, often at the middle or upper level management ranks.
  • Attend training courses in areas such as supervision for not-for-profits, fundraising, supervising volunteers, and various topics relating specifically to the not-for-profit sector. May develop and/or implement policies or programs within their organization based on material learned in training courses. (e.g. devise and manage a fundraising program to meet the fiscal needs of the organization.)
  • Play a role in the training of employees in not-for-profit-related subject matter.

Discussion Topics:

If students are familiar with some (but not necessarily all) of the following topics, they may be eligible for lower-level credit in the area of not-for-profit management. If students are familiar with advanced questions, they may be eligible for upper-level credit. If knowledge of some of the topics is substantial, the students may consider requesting additional credit in more narrowly defined areas.

Manager’s Roles

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • Describe some differences between not-for-profit management and for-profit management.
  • List some roles of the manager of a not-for-profit.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • What is the manager’s functional relationship to the organization? Describe this relationship in terms of the manager’s roles.
  • Contrast the manager’s relationship with the board of directors to that of their relationship with the rest of the organization.

Organizations

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • Describe some types of not-for-profit organizations.
  • Explain the importance of the organization’s mission.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • Give examples of functional and divisional organizational structures and contrast their differences in terms of effects on the organization.
  • What are the effects of public policy on the not-for-profit organization and how can the manager take advantage of or avoid these issues?

Managing Human Resources

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • What are some reasons not-for-profits depend on volunteers?
  • Describe some of the problems that may be encountered when using volunteers?

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • What kind of programs can management create to attract volunteers?
  • Why is it difficult to retain volunteers and what can management do to improve this situation?
  • What are some methods management can use to motivate volunteers? Explain how each method would be a motivator.

Managing Financial Resources

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • Describe how not-for-profits raise money.
  • Explain why it is necessary for not-for-profits to use fundraising.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • Contrast the different methods management can use to raise funds for the not-for-profit, and explain the value of each method.
  • How does management handle excess cash in a not-for-profit and how do these methods add or detract from the mission of the organization?

Ethics and Social Responsibility

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • Describe some of the ethical reasons people choose to work for not-for-profit organizations.
  • Define social responsibility.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • What are some ways not-for-profit organizations practice social responsibility and what is management’s role in reinforcing these practices?
  • What are some methods management can use to define ethics as part of the organization’s practices?

Not-For-Profit Management Summary Form click here