Case Management

A Guide to Credit for Prior Learning

Typical Learning Experiences of Students Earning Lower-Level Credit:

  • Work in the human service field, with a significant portion of that experience directly related to case management.
  • Attend training sessions in areas such as interpersonal skills, supervision, delivery of services, cultural diversity, values and ethics, mental and physical disabilities substance abuse, and financial entitlements.

Typical Learning Experiences of Students Earning Upper-Level Credit:

  • Work in the human service field, largely in case management, often for more than two years in a supervisory capacity.
  • Attend one or more training sessions in the topics listed above. Often play a role in the preparation and delivery of such training sessions to subordinates.
  • Applicants for upper level credit in this area are often granted credit in an area more narrowly defined. Common topics for which upper-level credit is awarded are advocacy, linking/referral and team treatment, crisis intervention, individual service planning, daily living skills training and financial entitlements.

Discussion Topics:

If students are familiar with some (but not necessarily all) of the following topics they may be eligible for lower-level credit in the area of case management. If the students are familiar with advanced questions, they may be eligible for upper-level credit. If knowledge of some of the topics is substantial, students may consider requesting additional credit in more narrowly defined areas.

Case Management: Definition and Roles

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • Define case management.
  • Explain the role of the case manager.
  • Describe the preparation one needs in order to effectively perform as a case manager.
  • Explain the steps a case manager takes when given an assignment from assessment through evaluation.
  • Explain the relationships between managed care and case management.
  • Summarize the historical developments that helped/contributed to the modern practices of case management.
  • Explain how the case manager performs the following case management functions: a) assessment, b) planning, c) intervention, d) monitoring, e) evaluation.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of becoming an independent case manager.

Advocacy

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • What is the role of advocate as performed by a case manager?
  • Describe some of the specific situations in which a case manager would function as advocate.
  • What are intensive case managers and what types of clients require their services?
  • Explain the laws governing: a) patients’ rights, b) patient entitlements, c) fair treatment under the law.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • Discuss the process by which a case manager would determine the appropriate strategy for resolution of client issues.
  • Describe the criteria by which a case manager would evaluate the outcome of the resolution strategies.
  • Explain how a case manager can use advocacy to impact public policies.

Linking/Referral

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • To what specific services might a case manager link a client?
  • How does the case manager assess a client’s need for additional services?How does the case manager access available referral service within a particular community?
  • Summarize the roles and responsibilities of claims personnel in payor and provider agencies.
  • Explain the case manager’s role in the quality assurance and utilization processes.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • What are the criteria by which a case manager evaluates the effectiveness of his or her referral?
  • How does a case manager resolve a conflict between client need and availability of services?
  • Explain the best methods and steps the case manager can use to ensure effective communication with multiple agencies/staff when managing a cure.
  • Summarize the steps followed to evaluate: a) necessity, b) appropriateness, and c) efficiency in the use of services.

Crisis Intervention

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • Define crisis intervention.
  • Describe some of the specific situations in which a case manager would be called upon to practice crisis intervention.
  • Describe effective techniques for dealing with a client in crisis.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • Explain some of the appropriate steps a case manager would take to follow-up after implementing crisis intervention.
  • What are the criteria by which a case manager would evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention?
  • Describe some of the strategies a case manager may develop in order to prevent recurrence of crisis for that particular client.

Individual Service Plan (ISP)

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • Define an ISP.
  • Explain the purpose of an ISP.
  • Describe the process of devising an ISP.
  • Explain some techniques used to facilitate client empowerment.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • What are the criteria by which a case manager would evaluate whether the goals of the ISP are being met?
  • What strategies would a case manager develop to help clients who are not meeting their goals?
  • Given a case description, design a plan that would facilitate the client’s empowerment, and explain how or why it would do so.

Daily Living Skills Training

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • What are some daily living skills a client might need to develop?
  • How does this training fit into the role of a case manager?

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • Describe some strategies a case manager would devise to motivate a client to work consistently on daily living skills.
  • Explain the connection between mastering daily living skills and becoming successfully rehabilitated into the community.

Personal Values and Qualities

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • Describe some of the personal characteristics needed to be an effective case manager.
  • State some of the values and ethical concepts that are important to perform this job.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • Describe how the case manager fits into the agency and into the community as a whole.
  • Describe an ethical dilemma a case manager might face and relate how he or she might resolve it.

Financial Entitlements

Facts, definitions, concepts (lower-level):

  • Describe some of the basic entitlements for which clients need assistance from the case manager.
  • Differentiate between Medicare and Medicaid.
  • Explain the case manager’s role in helping clients obtain financial entitlements.

Relationships, knowledge of discipline, methodologies (upper-level):

  • Describe how a case manager might solve a specific dilemma between a particular client’s needs and the restrictions of the “system.”
  • Given a case description, explain how a case manager might advise a subordinate who needs help negotiating the “red tape” surrounding obtaining financial entitlements for a client.

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